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H1 BIOM30001 Complete Notes (with bonus questions!)

Written by T

Contains the full set of up to date notes for BIOM30001 with all necessary information (including pi...

64 pages, 25000 words

H1 (83) Notes for Frontiers of Biomedicine

Written by Daniel

These comprehensive notes encompass all the lectures and additional notes required for the following...

85 pages, 41119 words

BIOM30001 COMPLETE LECTURE NOTES

Written by Peter

If you want to easily get a H1 for anatomy and a score above 90, then theres are the notes for you....

106 pages, 46606 words

H1 (91) Complete Notes for Frontiers for Biomedicine

Written by Ryan

All topics for Frontiers included to great detail! 1 - Metabolic Syndrome 2 - Stem Cells 3 - Resp...

63 pages, 25213 words

BIOM30001 Frontiers in Biomedicine Complete Notes

Written by Quratulann

These are a complete set of notes for FIB and cover each topic in depth. Includes tables and diagram...

56 pages, 23491 words

BIOM30001 Summary Notes (H1- 89)

Written by N

BIOM30001 is a tricky subject, as it's not about learning all the details but rather being able to w...

14 pages, 6670 words

H1 Frontiers in Biomedicine Course Summary Notes

Written by Paul

This subject is not content heavy, but all examination is written response - so these notes show out...

18 pages, 5712 words

Respiratory Diseases - H1 exam focused notes

Written by Grace

H1 detailed study notes! Everything you need to know is summarised concisely in these notes The...

52 pages, 13388 words

Pain - H1 exam focused notes

Written by Grace

H1 detailed study notes! Everything you need to know is summarised concisely in these notes Thes...

45 pages, 11339 words

Stem Cells - H1 exam focused notes

Written by Grace

H1 detailed study notes! Everything you need to know is summarised concisely in these notes The...

28 pages, 8981 words

Preeya

$25 per hour

*Zoom Tutorials available* I am third year postgraduate medical student at the university of Melb...

Bansari

$50 per hour

Hi! I am an immunology enthusiast! I am currently doing an honours year in Bachelor of Biomedicine...

Reviews

A very different core subject in the Biomed course which focused on integrative understanding rather than attention to fine details. The learning blocks were metabolic syndrome, stem cells & tissue engineering, respiratory health & disease, and mental health. These topics were quite interesting and were tackled not just from the biology/clinical perspective, but also from a public/global health, social & ethical perspective.

Anonymous, Semester 2, 2019

This subject is unlike any of the other Biomed cores, and while the opinions about it vary, I thought it was a refreshing change from all the content heavy subjects we have done thus far. There is little emphasis placed on learning each and every one of the small details in lectures, but rather the idea is to take away a big picture view of each topic: metabolic syndrome, stem cells/bioengineering, respiratory diseases, and mental health. This was a little confusing at times, as some lectures were incredibly detailed and it was hard to know what to focus study on. However as it turned out, the MCQs (in the MST, and final exam) were very well written, as they assessed detail, but not random bits of information or a seemingly meaningless dot point on a singular lecture slide. The mental health block was a new addition this year, and while some if it was a little bit repetitive and dry (very different material to what we were used to, lots of sociology/population health content, it was was taught quite well overall. Integration is a key focus in this subject, as you are expected to draw links between lectures to create an overall picture of an issue, that you could describe in-depth in written answers. The assignments are easy to do well on, provided you engage with the topics before starting. Overall, this subject was well coordinated and Rosa will make it a fantastic experience for the cohort.

Anonymous, Semester 2, 2019

I think this subject has changed a lot since the last review (2016) and probably for the better. The subject focusses mainly on graduate skill building (eg writing, peer review, debating), and you will always have some sort of assignment or task to be working on alongside lectures. This juggling act is quite challenging. I found the lectures (on the whole) to be pretty interesting and you're given a holistic appreciation for disease, disorder and health across four topic areas (metabolic syndrome, stem cells and tissues, respiratory health, mental health). This subject has a big emphasis on public/social health, more so than M2M, which is actually very refreshing. I should also add that lecture content seems have changed depending on lecturer availability and feedback so some parts of those notes above for purchase may not be relevant to the course anymore or when you take FIB. Looking back on it, I got a lot out of the subject in terms of skills, and if you can too if you go into it with an open mind and ready to apply yourself and work hard.

Anonymous, Semester 2, 2018

A very difficult subject to follow if you rely on the lectures to guide you. I found it a lot easier to do well by practising questions and engaging with the material outside of the lecture notes.

Anonymous, Semester 2, 2016

If you can be bothered learning all the content yourself, this is a very interesting subject. as it is, it is hectic, confusing and poorly coordinated. I did a whole lot of independent studying for this subject, and I think it was the best way to power through it

Anonymous, Semester 2, 2015